15 Dr. Seuss Books For Every Child To Read

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Why Your Children Should Read Dr. Seuss Books

Reading to children at an early age and encouraging them to be book lovers adds to the youngster’s literacy development. Kids start learning before their formal education begins. Early reading builds up a child’s memory, vocabulary, concentration, creative ability and life skills. Of all the many books you could offer your children, Dr. Seuss books have the magical mix of instruction and stimulation. Kids love Dr. Seuss books and parents realize that the books are benefiting their kids in many ways.

The books are intriguing for all ages, regardless of whether your child can read or not. The colors are a wide spectrum of vivid representations of the stories.  The words are lists of rhymes that your child will enjoy listening to. The colors attract the newborns, and toddlers to the silly words.

Dr. Seuss’ books are exciting and fun! This attitude toward reading will encourage your children to want to be read to.  And this will encourage them to read once those skills begin to develop.  Reading at an early age will encourage them to continue reading.  This will not only increase their reading skills.  They will also develop skills that will help them during their schooling and, possibly, at work.

Reading these books to younger children will help in language development. Children will begin to see the repeated words and begin to question them, what they mean, why they are used, and so on. The silly words will boost their creativeness and help with word development.

Any kind of reading will build confidence in your child.  Dr. Seuss books will boost confidence more as they begin to start recognizing words at an early stage due to the basic language used. Let your child begin to read these books when they begin to recognize the words. When they can read a sentence without help, they will be more confident in recognizing words from other books.

Who is Dr. Seuss?

THEODOR SEUSS GEISEL—aka Dr. Seuss—is one of the most beloved children’s book authors of all time. From The Cat in the Hat to Oh, the Places You’ll Go!, his iconic characters, stories, and art style have been a lasting influence on generations of children and adults. The books he wrote and illustrated under the name Dr. Seuss (and others that he wrote but did not illustrate, including some under the pseudonyms Theo LeSieg and Rosetta Stone) have been translated into thirty languages. Hundreds of millions of copies have found their way into homes and hearts around the world. Dr. Seuss’s long list of awards includes Caldecott Honors for McElligot’s Pool, If I Ran the Zoo, and Bartholomew and the Oobleck, the Pulitzer Prize, and eight honorary doctorates. Works based on his original stories have won three Oscars, three Emmys, three Grammys, and a Peabody.  Visit Wikipedia for a more comprehensive article about Dr. Seuss.

The List:

My Book about Me, by Me Myself

 

Amazon.com Editorial Review

One of the titles for the younger crowd in the Beginners Books series, My Book About Me has an unusual interactive twist–you make it up as you go along. On each page there’s something new to complete, from “I weigh ___ pounds” to “My teeth. I counted them. I have ___ up top. I have ___ downstairs.” It’s a simple idea, but with a surprising amount of educational value–getting children to name their home country, to recognize and draw in the color of their own eyes, learn their telephone number and address, to name favorite clothes, foods, and colors, and more. Finally, there’s a two-page spread where each owner of the book can write his or her own story. Illustrator Roy McKie’s style is halfway between the P.D. Eastman of Are You My Mother and the mainstream Seuss of Cat in the Hat and Thidwick: The Big-Hearted Moose. (Ages 4 to 8) –Richard Farr

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Fox in Socks

 

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“This Fox is a tricky fox. He’ll try to get your tongue in trouble.” Dr. Seuss gives fair warning to anyone brave enough to read along with the Fox in Socks, who likes to play tongue-twisting games with his friend Mr. Knox. “Here’s an easy game to play. Here’s an easy thing to say…. New socks. Two socks. Whose socks? Sue’s socks.” But Mr. Fox Socks isn’t about to let Knox off so easy. Soon Goo-Goose is choosing to chew chewy gluey blue goo, while tweetle beetles battle with paddles in a puddle (in case you were wondering, that’s called a “tweetle beetle puddle paddle battle”). Mr. Knox gets exasperated: “I can’t blab such blibber blubber! My tongue isn’t made of rubber.” But he catches on to the game before it’s all through. One of Seuss’s best, this must-read-aloud classic is guaranteed to get many giggles out of readers young and old. (Ages 4 to 8) –Paul Hughes

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The Cat in the Hat Comes Back

 

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That behatted and bow-tied cat from Dr. Seuss’s The Cat in the Hat is back, and, not surprisingly, is up to all sorts of mischief. This time, Sally and her brother are stuck shoveling snow: “This was no time for play./ This was no time for fun./ This was no time for games./ There was work to be done.” But–you guessed it–the laughing Hat Cat has other ideas, as he lets himself in to eat cake in their tub. He leaves behind “a big long pink cat ring,” which he then handily cleans with “MOTHER’S WHITE DRESS!” The dress then loses its pink stain to the wall, then Dad’s shoes, then the rug in the hall, until finally the Cat must call in some assistance: from inside his hat comes Little Cat A, then Littler Cats B, C, D, E, and so on, nested like dolls in ever tinier hats. With this pack of felines, Sally and her brother may get rid of those stains, but they’ll likely never be rid of that rascally cat. As should be expected from the good doctor, The Cat in the Hat Comes Back provides an excellent reader (and alphabet primer) for those just learning, not to mention ample laughs for everyone else. (Ages 4 to 8) –Paul Hughes

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Oh, The Places You’ll Go!

 

Amazon.com Editorial Review

Inspirational yet honest, and always rhythmically rollicking, Oh, the Places You’ll Go! is a perfect sendoff for children, 1 to 100, entering any new phase of their lives. Kindergartners, graduate students, newlyweds, newly employeds–all will glean shiny pearls of wisdom about the big, bountiful future. The incomparable Dr. Seuss rejoices in the potential everyone has to fulfill their wildest dreams: “You’ll be on your way up! / You’ll be seeing great sights! / You’ll join the high fliers / who soar to high heights.” At the same time, he won’t delude the starry-eyed upstart about the pitfalls of life: “You can get all hung up / in a prickle-ly perch. / And your gang will fly on. / You’ll be left in a Lurch.”

But fear not! Dr. Seuss, with his inimitable illustrations and exhilarating rhymes, is convinced (“98 and 3/4 percent guaranteed”) that success is imminent. As long as you remember “to be dexterous and deft. And NEVER mix up your right foot with your left,” things should work out. (All ages) –Emilie Coulter

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Hop on Pop (I Can Read It All By Myself)

 

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First published in 1963, Hop on Pop remains a perennial favorite when it comes to teaching kids to read. Here, as in most of his extensive body of work, Dr. Seuss creates uncomplicated, monosyllabic rhymes to foster learning and inspire children to read. But what was radical about this little book at the time of publication (and what makes it still compelling today) is Seuss’s departure from the traditionally dull pictures and sentences used in reading primers. In contrast, the illustrations here are wild and wonderful, and the accompanying language, while simple, is delightfully silly. For example, the rhyme “THREE TREE / Three fish in a tree / Fish in a tree? / How can that be?” is brought to life with a trio of plump, self-satisfied fish perched atop globular branches as two stymied hybrid dog-rabbit-humanoids look on in consternation. Hop on Pop does much more than teach children the basics of word construction, it also introduces them to the incomparable pleasure of reading a book. (Ages Baby to Preschooler)

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One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish

 

Amazon.com Editorial Review

“Did you ever fly a kite in bed? Did you ever walk with ten cats on your head?” Such are the profound, philosophical queries posed in this well-loved classic by Theodor “Dr. Seuss” Geisel. While many rhymes in this couplet collection resemble sphinx-worthy riddles, Seuss’s intention is clear: teach children to read in a way that is both entertaining and educational. It matters little that each wonderful vignette has nothing to do with the one that follows. (We move seamlessly from a one-humped Wump and Mister Gump to yellow pets called the Zeds with one hair upon their heads.) Children today will be as entranced by these ridiculous rhymes as they have been since the book’s original publication in 1960–so amused and enchanted, in fact, they may not even notice they are learning to read! (Ages 4 to 8)

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The Cat in the Hat

 

Amazon.com Editorial Review

He may be an old standby, but he never lets us down. When in doubt, turn to the story of the cat that transformed a dull, rainy afternoon into a magical and just-messy-enough adventure. There’s another, hidden adventure, too: this book really will help children learn to read. With his simple and often single-vowel vocabulary, the good Doctor knew what he was doing: hear it, learn it, read it–laughing all the way. The Cat in the Hat is a must for any child’s library.

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Green Eggs and Ham

 

Amazon.com Editorial Review

This timeless Dr. Seuss classic was first published in 1960, and has been delighting readers ever since. Sam-I-am is as persistent as a telemarketer, changing as many variables as possible in the hopes of convincing the nameless skeptic that green eggs and ham are a delicacy to be savored. He tries every manner of presentation with this “nouveau cuisine”–in a house, with a mouse, in a box, with a fox, with a goat, on a boat–to no avail. Then finally, finally the doubter caves under the tremendous pressure exerted by the tireless Sam-I-am. And guess what? Well, you probably know what happens, but even after reading Green Eggs and Ham the thousandth time, the climactic realization that green eggs and ham are “so good, so good, you see” is still a rush. As usual, kids will love Dr. Seuss’s wacky rhymes and whimsical illustrations–and this time, they might even be so moved as to finally take a taste of their broccoli. (Ages 4 to 8)

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Horton Hears a Who!

 

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Surely among the most lovable of all Dr. Seuss creations, Horton the Elephant represents kindness, trustworthiness, and perseverance–all wrapped up, thank goodness, in a comical and even absurd package. Horton hears a cry for help from a speck of dust, and spends much of the book trying to protect the infinitesimal creatures who live on it from the derision and trickery of other animals, who think their elephant friend has gone quite nutty. But worse is in store: an eagle carries away the clover in which Horton has placed the life-bearing speck, and “let that small clover drop somewhere inside / of a great patch of clovers a hundred miles wide!” Horton wins in the end, after persuading the “Who’s” to make as much noise as possible and prove their existence. This classic is not only fun, but a great way to introduce thoughtful children to essentially philosophical questions. How, after all, are we so sure there aren’t invisible civilizations floating by on every mote? (Ages 4 to 8) –Richard Farr

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Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories

 

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Yet more wisdom cast down from high atop Mt. Seuss, this cheerful trio of tales teaches some valuable lessons in humility–thanks to a sharp-eyed worm, a bragging bear and rabbit, a fuzzy-tailed bird, and a couple hundred turtles led by their foolish King Yertle.

Yertle’s story leads off with his attempt to build a bigger kingdom on the backs of his loyal subjects (literally). King of everything he can see, Yertle orders his turtles to stack up under him to build a towering throne. (“He made each turtle stand on another one’s back and he piled them all up in a nine-turtle stack.”) But a plain little turtle named Mack–stuck at the bottom–decides he’s had enough. (“I know up on top you are seeing great sights, but down on the bottom we, too, should have rights!”)

Following Yertle’s downfall, a whiny girl-bird named Gertrude McFuzz wishes she had two feathers, just like Miss Lolla-Lee-Lou: “One droopy-droop feather. That’s all that she had. And, oh! That one feather made Gertrude so sad.” But even when Gertrude gets her wish–and then some–she finds that vanity has its price. Meanwhile, in “The Big Brag,” a proud rabbit and an even-prouder bear duke it out in a battle of the senses, arguing over who’s the best of the beasts, only to get their clever comeuppance from a wild-eyed little worm. (Ages 4 to 8) –Paul Hughes

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The Lorax

 

Amazon.com Editorial Review

When Dr. Seuss gets serious, you know it must be important. Published in 1971, and perhaps inspired by the “save our planet” mindset of the 1960s, The Lorax is an ecological warning that still rings true today amidst the dangers of clear-cutting, pollution, and disregard for the earth’s environment. In The Lorax, we find what we’ve come to expect from the illustrious doctor: brilliantly whimsical rhymes, delightfully original creatures, and weirdly undulating illustrations. But here there is also something more–a powerful message that Seuss implores both adults and children to heed.

The now remorseful Once-ler–our faceless, bodiless narrator–tells the story himself. Long ago this enterprising villain chances upon a place filled with wondrous Truffula Trees, Swomee-Swans, Brown Bar-ba- loots, and Humming-Fishes. Bewitched by the beauty of the Truffula Tree tufts, he greedily chops them down to produce and mass-market Thneeds. (“It’s a shirt. It’s a sock. It’s a glove. It’s a hat.”) As the trees swiftly disappear and the denizens leave for greener pastures, the fuzzy yellow Lorax (who speaks for the trees “for the trees have no tongues”) repeatedly warns the Once-ler, but his words of wisdom are for naught. Finally the Lorax extricates himself from the scorched earth (by the seat of his own furry pants), leaving only a rock engraved “UNLESS.” Thus, with his own colorful version of a compelling morality play, Dr. Seuss teaches readers not to fool with Mother Nature. But as you might expect from Seuss, all hope is not lost–the Once-ler has saved a single Truffula Tree seed! Our fate now rests in the hands of a caring child, who becomes our last chance for a clean, green future. (Ages 4 to 8)

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The Sneetches and Other Stories

 

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“Now, the Star-Belly Sneetches / Had bellies with stars. / The Plain-Belly Sneetches / Had none upon thars.” This collection of four of Dr. Seuss’s most winning stories begins with that unforgettable tale of the unfortunate Sneetches, bamboozled by one Sylvester McMonkey McBean (“the Fix-it-up Chappie”), who teaches them that pointless prejudice can be costly. Following the Sneetches, a South-Going Zax and a North-Going Zax seem determined to butt heads on the prairie of Prax. Then there’s the tongue-twisting story of Mrs. McCave–you know, the one who had 23 sons and named them all Dave. (She realizes that she’d be far less confused had she given them different names, like Marvin O’Gravel Balloon Face or Zanzibar Buck-Buck McFate.) A slightly spooky adventure involving a pair of haunted trousers–“What was I scared of?”–closes out the collection. Sneetches and Other Stories is Seuss at his best, with distinctively wacky illustrations and ingeniously weird prose. (Ages 4 to 8) –Paul Hughes

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I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew

 

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Our nameless hero–a typical Seuss hybrid who’s part bear, part puppy, and part beyond categorization–has an innocent, carefree life, until it’s ruined by minor problems. With a toe stubbed, and a tail bitten by a Quilligan Quail (“And I learned there are troubles of more than one kind. Some come from ahead, and some come from behind”), he sets out on an ill-fated journey to find a better, less troublesome place: the fabled city of Solla Sollew, no less, “on the banks of the beautiful River Wah-Hoo,/ Where they never have troubles. At least very few.” Like most dreamlands, Solla Sollew is harder to attain than expected–nobody seems to know how to get there, and the journey is far worse than anyone anticipated. When the fair city is finally attained there is, of course, a last straw; but a happy twist suggests troubles may be better faced than escaped. (Ages 4 to 8) –Richard Farr

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On Beyond Zebra!

 

Amazon.com Editorial Review

A thoroughly Seussian tweak of the alphabet-book tradition, On Beyond Zebra is about all the letters that most people ignore–the ones that come after Z. Our hero (instantly recognizable to most Seuss fans as the boy who captured Thing One and Thing Two in The Cat in the Hat) takes his young friend, Conrad Cornelius O’Donald O’Dell, on a guided tour of all the weird creatures that begin with letters such as Yuzz, Wumbus, and Glikk. “And Nuh is the letter I use to spell Nutches, Who live in small caves, known as Nitches, for hutches.” The message is pretty simple: the alphabet pins down boring old “reality,” but if you explore further afield there are more interesting worlds to discover. “So, on beyond Z! It’s high time you were shown, / That you really don’t know all there is to be known.” Explorers in need of guidance will even find a table of useful new letters (a beyondabet? a WumbaGlikk?) in the back. (Ages 4 to 8) –Richard Farr

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McElligot’s Pool

 

Amazon.com Editorial Review

McElligot’s Pool is a Seuss classic from the distant era before even The Cat In The Hat. It’s a single poetic variation on the theme of adult skepticism that’s no match for childhood faith and daydreaming. A small boy is fishing in the tiny, unpromising McElligot’s Pool, a puddle that (as a passing farmer informs our diminutive hero) is nothing but a hole where people dispose of their junk. But the boy is all optimism: what if the pool is deeper than anyone thinks? What if it connects to an underground stream that flows under the town to the sea? Might not all sorts of fish then swim up the stream and be caught here? “I might catch an eel… (Well, I might. It depends.) A long twisting eel with a lot of strange bends. And, oddly enough, with a head at both ends!” The moral of the story is straightforward: “If I wait long enough, if I’m patient and cool,/ Who knows what I’ll catch in McElligot’s pool?” (Ages 4 to 8) –Richard Farr

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